DETAILED DESCRIPTION


DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The stabilizing recoil lug comprises two main components: a Mil-spec 1913 rail 12 (i.e., a picatinny rail, scope base, cross-slotted base or rail, 1913 rail, top receiver rail, or receiver rail) and a stabilizing recoil lug 10 (i.e., recoil lug, lug, washer, spacer, recoil ring, ring spacer, ring washer, barrel spacer, receiver spacer, recoil absorption ring, etc.). As shown in FIG. 1, in one embodiment, the stabilizing recoil lug 10 is positioned in line between the barrel 17 and the action receiver 11. In one embodiment, the scope rings 19 attach a scope 16 (i.e., reticle, glass, rifle scope, etc.) to a rail 12, the rail 12 is attached to the action receiver 11, and the action receiver sits in a stock 15 (i.e., buttstock, chassis, etc.). In yet other embodiments, the rail can be used to support night vision or other sighting devices. In one embodiment, the stabilizing recoil lug 10 forms a ring having an external diameter that is the same as the external diameter of the receiver face. In one embodiment, the stabilizing recoil lug 10 fits over the outside threading of the end of the barrel 17so that it does not interfere with the screwthreads on the end of the barrel 17 when the barrel 17 is screwed into the action receiver 11. In another embodiment, the inner circle of the stabilizing recoil lug 10 can be threaded to receive the threading on the barrel 17 so that the lug 10 can be screwed directly onto the barrel 17. In one embodiment, the stabilizing recoil lug 10 has the same external diameter as the external diameter of the action receiver 11, but in other embodiments the stabilizing recoil lug 10 can have a smaller or larger diameter than the external diameter of the action receiver 11.

In one embodiment, the stabilizing recoil lug 10 is made from aluminum, aluminum alloy (e.g., 6061, 7075, or 7068), titanium, steel, steel alloy, stainless steel (e.g., 300, 303, 304, or 400 grade), or a composite. In one embodiment, a resilient material is used for the lug that will compress to absorb recoil and then expand to its original size.

As shown in exemplary FIG. 2, a cutaway view of the location designated in FIG. 1, the stabilizing recoil lug 10 has a bottom with a pin hole 10and a top with a key 7 (i.e., pin, shaft, fastener, tab, nub, protrusion, protuberance, member, shaft, rod, mandrel, ball, cone, woodruff key, etc.). The barrel 17 and the action receiver 11 each have a dorsal surface facing the scope 16 and a ventral surface facing the stock 15. The key 7 on the dorsal end of the stabilizing recoil lug 10extends above the dorsal surface of the barrel 17 and the action receiver 11, and it fits into a pocket (i.e., a keyseat, keyway, slot, groove, opening, detent, collar, collet, etc.) formed out of the bottom of the rail 12.

As shown in exemplary FIG. 3, the rail 12 has a top and a bottom, and a pocket 8 in the bottom that is shaped to receive the key 7 of the stabilizing recoil lug 10. In one embodiment, the stabilizing recoil lug 10 has a greater external diameter than the external diameter of the barrel 17 and equal to the external diameter of the action receiver 11. In other embodiments, the diameter of the stabilizing recoil lug 10 relative to the action receiver 11 and the barrel 17 vary. In one embodiment, the stabilizing recoil lug 10 is the same external diameter as the action receiver so that it fits a standard stock 15 for that receiver without any modifications. In one embodiment, the rings 19 (i.e., scope rings, scope base rings, clamps, scope stabilizers, etc.) are separate from the scope base 12, but in other embodiments, the rings 19and the scope base 12 are integrally formed as a single piece. As an integral unit, the rings 19 are less adjustable, but also less prone to movement. In one embodiment, the rail 12 is a standard MIL-spec 1913 Rail. In other embodiments, the rail is customized to fit a particular scope and action receiver. For example, an integrally formed rail and rings would not need to have the same pattern on top of the rail and would not need a pocket and key. In one example, the disclosed device fits directly to dove tail mounts on the action receiver 11. In yet another embodiment, the key 7 and stabilizing recoil lug 10 can be used with a two piece rail (not shown) by having a pocket in one of the rails that connects with the key. As shown in FIG. 3, in one embodiment the pocket matches the forward facing and backward facing sides of the key 7, thus preventing the rail from moving forward or backward relative to the lug. In one embodiment, as shown in FIG. 3, the pocket does not exactly match the key, but wall of the pocket touches a side of the key to prevent horizontal movement in any direction. As shown in FIG. 3, the key 7 fits the pocket walls with an interference fit on at least three sides (i.e., left side, right side, and back side). As shown in FIG. 3, the key 7 fits the pocket in an interference fits on at least two sides (i.e., front and back side). As the majority of the recoil, when a rifle is fired, is in the rearward direction, the back or rear side of the key 7 should fit snuggly against rear wall of the pocket to prevent the rail from shifting. In other applications where the rifle is jostled in many directions, the side of key 7 should fit snugly against a pocket wall in every direction along a horizontal plane to hold the rail in place. As shown in FIG. 3, in one embodiment, the pocket has a wall or walls on all sides or has multiple walls that connect to form a geometric shape. Described another way, when the key 7 is in the pocket and the rail is screwed to the action receiver, the recoil lug 10 pins the rail 12 to the barrel and the action receiver so that the rail 12 cannot move in any horizontal direction relative to the recoil lug, barrel and action receiver.

In one embodiment, the key 7 on the stabilizing recoil lug 10 can be shaped as a square, rectangle, triangle, circle, pyramid, oval, or another geometric shape; provided that the pocket 8 is shaped to receive it. In one embodiment, the sides of the key 7 can be tapered or vertical; provided that the pocket 8 is shaped to receive it. In one embodiment, the key 7 fits the pocket 8 tightly, pushed on forced fit, or interference fit, but not hammer tight. In one embodiment, the rim of the uncoated pocket 8 is about 0.0002 inches wider and 0.0002 inches longer than the key 7, leaving 0.0001 inches of clearance on each side. In one embodiment, when the key 7 is coated (i.e., with KG Coating, Cerakoting, etc.) the key 7 will be between about 0.0001 wider and thicker than the pocket 8. In one embodiment, the ratio of dimensions around the coated key 7 to the dimensions around the pocket 8 ranges between about 0.1 to 0.9990 inches and 0.1 to 0.1005 inches. If the key 7 is more than 0.0005 inches smaller in either width or thickness than the pocket 8, then the pocket 8 will not properly hold the key 7, lug 10, and rail 12 in place. If the key 7 is more than 0.0002 inches wider or thicker than the pocket 8, then it will not fit into the pocket 8 properly. If the key 7 is uncoated, then the key 7should be about 0.0005 thinner and narrower than the pocket 8. In one embodiment, the key 7 is between about 0.0005 to 0.0001 inches narrower and thinner than the pocket 8. The coating provides some flexibility and fills in the gaps, which allows the key 7 to fit the pocket 8 tightly. In one embodiment, when the key 7 is coated, it will connect to the pocket 8 with an “interference fit.” In one embodiment, if an uncoated key 7 is used, then it will be sized appropriately to connect to the pocket 8 with an “interference fit.” In many embodiments, the pocket 8 is uncoated. In some embodiments, the pocket 8 may also be coated or coated instead of the key 7.

As shown in FIG. 4, when the rail 12 is seated on the action receiver 11, the bottom of the rail 12 fits the dorsal surface of the action receiver 11. In one embodiment, screws 20 hold the rail 12 against the action receiver 11. In one embodiment, as shown in the cutaway portion of FIG. 4, the stabilizing recoil lug 10 fits between the barrel 17, the action receiver 11, and the rail 12 without leaving any gaps that could lead to instability. As shown in FIG. 5, the screws 20 are separated or apart from the stabilizing recoil lug 10. In one embodiment, the key 7 fits snugly into the pocket 8. The key 7 does not interfere with the attachment screws 20.

In one embodiment, the key 7 can be permanently attached to the pocket 8, for example, it can be welded, fused, soldered, screwed, attached with Loctite or an adhesive. In such an embodiment, the position of the rail 12 relative to the lug 10 is reinforced.

As shown in FIG. 6, in one embodiment, the pocket 8 is slightly deeper than the key 7 so that the top of the key 7 does not touch the top of the pocket when the rail 12 is attached to the action receiver 11. In one embodiment, there is no gap between the sidewalls of the pocket 8 and the sidewalls of the key 7. In one embodiment, the pinhole 10in the stabilizing recoil lug 10 aligns with a pinhole 11in the action receiver 11. The pinhole 11in the action receiver is present on most action receivers and the pinhole 10in the stabilizing recoil lug 10 can match the diameter of the pinhole for a particular action receiver 11. In one embodiment, the diameter of the stabilizing recoil lug 10 is the same as the diameter of the action receiver 11 at the point where the action receiver 11 touches the stabilizing recoil lug 10.

In one embodiment, the key 7 is rectangular shaped, measuring 0.250 inches high, 0.240 inches thick, and 0.480 inches wide, and the pocket 8 is 0.260 inches high (deep), 0.2402 inches thick (long), and 0.4802 inches wide.

In one embodiment, the device comprises a lug configured to sit in line between a barrel and an action receiver, said lug having a top and a bottom, and the action receiver having a dorsal surface, the top of the lug further comprising a key; and a rail configured to attach to the dorsal surface of the action receiver, the rail having a bottom, and the bottom of the rail further comprising a pocket to receive the key. When the key is in the pocket, the key holds the rail in tandem (i.e., held in conjunction with or conjoined) with the lug and both the rail and the lug move together with the barrel and action receiver. Explained another way, when the key is in the pocket, connecting the rail to the lug, the rail recoils in tandem with the lug, and because the lug is attached to the action receiver, the rail also recoils in tandem with the action receiver. Said yet another way, the key and the pocket reinforce the connection between the rail (an mounted scope) and the action receiver to strengthen and reinforce the screws holding the rail to the action receiver against shear forces during recoil and jostling of a firearm and in particular powerful shear forces rearwards during recoil. As the rail is traditionally held to the action receiver using screws, the majority of the shear forces acting on the screws is along a single horizontal plane at the connection point between the rail and the barrel and the action receiver. The device reinforces that connection to provide an additional point of strength to prevent any movement of the rail along that horizontal plane, relative to the lug. The lug prevents any movement relative to the barrel and action receiver so that the rail cannot move independently in any horizontal direction from the barrel and the action receiver. In one embodiment, the device further comprises a key having a top and a pocket having a ceiling, the key being shorter than the pocket, such that when the key is in the pocket there is a gap between the top of the key and the ceiling of the pocket. The device also has a pocket having at least three walls and a key having at least three sides, wherein when the key is in the pocket, each one of the at least three sides of the key touches at least one of the at least three walls of the pocket. As shown in FIG. 3, one embodiment of the key has a single, continuous side that forms a circle, oval, stadium or other shaped key without corners around the circumference of the key. In one embodiment, the device further comprises a pinhole in the lug, the pinhole corresponding to a pinhole of about the same size on an action receiver, wherein the lug can be pinned to the receiver by inserting a pin through both the pinhole on the lug and the pinhole on the action receiver.

In one embodiment, the device further comprises an integrally formed rail and lug, the rail omitting the pocket and the lug omitting the key, wherein the lug and rail are conjoined, molded, or printed (e.g., 3D printed) as a single piece. In one embodiment, the lug is a separate piece from the rail, and the sides of the key are permanently attached to the walls of the pocket.

In another embodiment, the stabilizing recoil lug comprises a washer configured to sit between a barrel and an action receiver, said washer having a protrusion on at least one side; the protrusion configured to fit into a pocket on the bottom of a picatinny rail; wherein when the protrusion is in the pocket, the key holds the rail in tandem with the washer and both the rail and the washer move together with the barrel and action receiver. In one embodiment, the lug further comprises a protrusion having a top and a pocket having a ceiling, the protrusion being shorter than the pocket, such that when the protrusion is in the pocket there is a gap between the top of the protrusion and the ceiling of the pocket. In one embodiment, the device of the current disclosure further comprises a pocket having at least three walls and a protrusion having at least three sides, wherein when the protrusion is in the pocket, each one of the at least three sides of the protrusion touches at least one of the at least three walls of the pocket. In one embodiment, the protrusion has a single, continuous side that forms a circle, oval or other curved shape (i.e., a rounded rectangle, stadium, etc.) around the circumference of the key. In one embodiment, each key side matches a pocket wall, and every pocket wall matches a key side. In one embodiment, the sides of the protrusion fit the walls of the pocket with an interference fit, and more particularly, each side of the protrusion fits a wall of the pocket with an interference fit.

In yet another embodiment, the device comprises a rail for attaching a scope to a rifle, the device having a Mil-spec 1913 rail, with a top and a bottom, the bottom of the rail further comprising a keyseat. The keyseat having a geometric shape to receive a matching key on a recoil lug. The rail can be a retrofit of an existing rail to fit the key on a recoil lug. When the rail is seated on an action receiver and a lug with a matching key is positioned between the action receiver and a barrel, the matching key fits into the keyseat. More specifically, in one embodiment, each side of the key has a shape that fits a corresponding wall of the keyseat, so that when the key is inserted in the keyseat, every side has a matching wall. In one embodiment, the device includes a keyseat having at least three sides and a rail having two ends, the keyseat located off center toward one end of the rail.

In one embodiment, the stabilizing recoil lug 10 can be pinned to the action receiver 11 through pinholes 10and 11a. In another embodiment, the stabilizing recoil lug 10 can be pinned to the action receiver 11 using pinholes on the sides or top of the stabilizing recoil lug 10; provided that the action receiver 11 has a pinhole in the same location to receive a pin. In one embodiment, each pinhole is about 0.093 inches in diameter. In another embodiment, the stabilizing recoil lug 10 can be permanently attached to the action receiver 11, for example, it can be welded, fused, soldered, screwed, or attached using Loctite or an adhesive. Alternatively, the stabilizing recoil lug 10 can be integral to the receiver.

As shown in FIG. 7, in one embodiment, the rail 12 connects to the action receiver with four screws 20. In another embodiment, the rail 12 connects with two screws 20. In yet another embodiment, the rail 12 connects with six screws. In one embodiment, the screws 20 are inset in the top of the rail 12 so that they are flush and will not interfere with the rings 19. In one embodiment, as shown in FIG. 7, the key 7 is rectangular with a radius edge (i.e., a rounded rectangle or a stadium) and fits into a matching shaped pocket. In one embodiment, the key 7 is triangular and fits into a matching pocket 8.

In additional embodiments, the rail 12 is a minute of angle (MOA) rail that roughly forms a triangle having a base that fits the action receiver 11 with the hypotenuse of the triangle-shaped rail forming the accessory attachment edge of the rail. The key 7 on the stabilizing recoil lug 10 can be made to fit any MOA rail. Existing rails can also be retrofitted to fit the key 7 by drilling, routing, or machining a pocket in the existing rail to receive the key.

In additional embodiments, the key 7 can be pinned to the receiver 11 using holes drilled through the rail 12 that correspond to holes drilled in the key 7. In other embodiments, the rail can be welded, fused, soldered, or attached using Loctite or an adhesive to the key 7 on the stabilizing recoil lug 10.

Using the device to stabilize a scope 16 and hold it in tandem to the rifle's barrel 17 can be accomplished in a number of steps. The method for maintaining the calibration of a rifle scope 16 on a rifle 1 comprises the following steps: positioning a lug 10 on a threaded end of a barrel 17 between the barrel 17 and an action receiver 11, the lug 10 having a top, a key 7 and an inner diameter, the inner diameter of the lug 10 being about equal to an external diameter of the threaded end of the barrel 17, and the action receiver 11 having a dorsal surface, the key 7 extending from the top of the lug 10 above the dorsal surface of the action receiver 11, and fastening a rail 12 to the dorsal surface of the action receiver 11 using fasteners, the rail 12 having a top and a bottom, and a pocket 8 located in the bottom of the rail 12. The key 7 fits the pocket 8 of the rail 12 when the rail 12 is fastened to the action receiver 11 and connects the rail 12 to the barrel 17. In one embodiment of the method, the lug 10 further comprises a key 7 having a top and the rail 12further comprising a pocket 8 having a ceiling, the key 7 being shorter than the pocket 8, such that when the key 7 is in the pocket 8 there is a gap between the between the top of the key 7 and the ceiling of the pocket 8. As shown in FIG. 3, when performing the method with in an embodiment of the key having a single continuous side, each side touches a wall of the pocket. In one embodiment of the method, the rail 12 further comprises a pocket 8 having at least three walls and the lug 10 having a key 7 with at least three sides. In one embodiment, the key 7 has a single, continuous side that forms a circle, oval or other curved shape (i.e., a rounded rectangle, stadium, etc.) around the circumference of the key 7. When the key 7 is in the pocket 8, each one of the at least three sides of the key 7 touches at least one of walls of the pocket 8. In one embodiment of the method, there is an additional step of permanently attaching the key 7 of the lug 10 to the pocket 8 of the rail 12. In one embodiment of the method, the lug 10 further comprises a pinhole 10a, the pinhole 10corresponding to a pinhole 11of about the same size on an action receiver 11, and the method further comprising the step of pinning the lug 10 to the action receiver 11 by inserting a pin through both the pinhole 10on the lug and the pinhole 11on the action receiver. In one embodiment of the method, the sides of the key 7 fit the walls of the pocket 8 with an interference fit.

In one embodiment of the method, a rail can be retrofitted by cutting or machining a pocket from the bottom of the rail, the pocket corresponding to the shape of the key on a lug of the present disclosure. By retrofitting and existing rail, a rail may simply be upgraded to include a pocket through minimal machining so that it will mate with the key of a recoil lug of the present disclosure, so that the retrofitted rail can be used together with the lug of the present disclosure to stabilize the scope of a rifle.

FIGS. 8-24 show alternative views of one embodiment of the device described from multiple angles.

In one embodiment, the key has a front and a back side and the pocket has a matching front and back side so that the rail moves in tandem forward and backward with the lug along a horizontal plane. By contrast, such an embodiment would not necessarily be restricted from side to side or lateral movement like the other embodiments above, but would still restrict the rail from any forward or back ward movement in tandem with the lug and action receiver during recoil.

In one embodiment (not shown), the pocket extends up through the rail forming a hole that passes through the rail. This allows the protrusion on the lug to extend all the way through the rail. In such an embodiment, the protrusion can be outfitted with a hole and a pin or a screw so that the lug can be pinned or screwed to the rail. In such an embodiment, care is taken to keep the protrusion on the lug from interfering with a scope mounted on the rail.

In the foregoing description, it will be readily appreciated by those skilled in the art that modifications may be made to the invention without departing from the concepts disclosed herein. Such modifications are to be considered as included in the following claims, unless the claims by their language expressly state otherwise.